Premier Autoworkers - Setting the Standards for a Safer Workplace. Premier Autoworkers - Setting the Standards for a Safer Workplace.
Premier Autoworkers - Setting the Standards for a Safer Workplace.
Premier Autoworkers - Setting the Standards for a Safer Workplace. Premier Autoworkers - Setting the Standards for a Safer Workplace.

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There were 122 fatalities in 2005 due to inadvertent contact with energized conditions in the manufacturing sector.

There were 122 fatalities in 2005 due to inadvertent contact with energized conditions in the manufacturing sector.

Arc Flash & Safe Electrical Work Practices.



An arc flash can result in temperatures up to 35,000 degrees F.

Arc Flash & Safe Electrical Work Practices.

There were 122 fatalities in 2005 due to inadvertent contact with energized conditions in the manufacturing sector.Premier Autoworkers, Inc. > Arc Flash

Arc Flash

Arc Flash Training | Arc Flash Protection
Arc Flash Procedures | Arc Flash Hazards




A complete safety audit of electrical substations and electrical drops greater than 50 volts performed by Premier, Inc.'s safety professionals will assist the safety manager in identifying and documenting arc flash hazard protection boundaries. Visual signage is developed for each location where arc flash hazards are likely to be present. These placards contain technical information, PPE requirements, lockout protocols, and other safety procedures required to comply with OSHA arc flash regulations. Visual instruction, training, and change management are all documented within Premier Inc.'s Custom Arc Flash and Factory Solutions™ system.

Arc flash incidents typically occur in applications above 120 volts and can occur when electrical equipment is being serviced or inspected.An Arc Flash is a short circuit through the air when insulation or isolation between electrical conductors is breached or can no longer withstand the applied voltage.An arc flash can result in temperatures up to 35,000 degrees F.

Arc Flash Hazards

An arc flash can result in temperatures up to 35,000 degrees F. This is four times hotter than the surface of the sun and can result in fatal burns up to five feet from the arc, and severe burns at distances up to ten feet away. In addition, an arc blast may occur. An arc blast results from the rapid heating of air and the vaporization of metal. Arc flash hazards involving arc blasts can create pressure waves that can damage hearing and cause a concussion resulting in memory loss. An arc blast can also result in flying metal, some of which may be molten.

Did You Know?

There were 122 fatalities in 2005 due to inadvertent contact with energized conditions in the manufacturing sector.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics



ARC FLASH OSHA C0MPLIANCE DEADLINE - AUGUST 13, 2007

Regulations Involved
On February 14, 2007 federal OSHA approved an upgrade to all of 1910. Subpart S, electrical safety standards. All these changes become effective as of August 13, 2007. The changes are extensive and include language from the following standards or requirements. NFPA 70-2002 /NEC (National Electric Code), NFPA 70E-2000 (Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplace including "Arc Flash"), 29CFR1910.269 (Electrical Power Generation Standard, 29CFR1910.301-.308, & 29CFR1910.331-.335 (Safe Electrical Work Practices, and IEEE1584 (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Guide for Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations).

What will federal OSHA be looking at as of August 13, 2007?

  • Compliance inspectors will now be examining training programs associated with safe electrical work practices.
  • Safe electrical design compliance.
  • Arc flash hazard assessments, are they being conducted?
  • Use of unqualified employees to work in/on electrical utility stations.
  • Lockout/tagout procedures.

What is "ARC FLASH"?
An Arc Flash is a short circuit through the air when insulation or isolation between electrical conductors is breached or can no longer withstand the applied voltage.

In an arc flash incident an enormous amount of concentrated radiant energy explodes outwards from the electrical equipment creating pressure waves that can damage a persons hearing, a high-intensity flash that can damage their eyesight and a superheated ball of gas that can severely burn a workers body and melt metal. The pressure wave can send loose material like pieces of damaged equipment, tools and other objects flying through the air. The best way to prevent Arc Flash from occurring is to de-energize the system before beginning any work and always verify the fact the energy is controlled.

Examples:

  • Arc flash incidents typically occur in applications above 120 volts and can occur when electrical equipment is being serviced or inspected.
  • Some incidents occur when a worker is removing a cover or trim from a piece of equipment.


What is a Flash Protection Boundary?
As per NFPA 70E and the NEC the flash protection boundaries define the safe working distances in which any qualified trades person can approach energized components with a certain level of personal protective equipment. An approach limit is a distance from exposed live parts within which a person could receive a second-degree burn if an electric arc flash where to occur. There are three such boundaries:

  • Prohibited Approach Boundary
  • Restricted Approach Boundary
  • Limited Approach Boundary

What you must do to achieve compliance and avoid any negative regulatory compliance activity? Remember the clock is ticking and August 13, 2007 is approaching fast!

  1. Train all of your affected trades persons or any other person you would require to work on energized circuits greater than 50 volts on the changes in the standards and the impact to them.
  2. Identify all areas in your facility where you would require qualified trades persons to work on when energized circuits greater than 50 volts.
  3. Complete a short circuit hazard analysis to identify the amount of incident energy that could be created if an arc flash were to occur.
  4. Label all areas identified with an arc flash hazard label identifying the level of personal protective equipment required, the voltage, the amount of incident energy, flash protection boundaries, and amperage.
  5. Hazard assessment of all facility substations.